Getting into college the right way

We have been providing families with our college planning services for many years and have seen our clients reach and exceed their goals for college.

Is there a right or wrong way to approach this very important time in your child's life?

Yes, there is, it is easy to get overwhelmed when thinking about college. As a student you will have to figure out ways to make yourself a desirable college applicant, learn to study effectively for those standardized tests, and have an action plan that will determine which colleges you’ll be applying to. Once this is done then, and also very important, you need to figure out how you and your family will fund your college dream.

It’s never too early to start planning for college, consider the classes that will look good on the transcripts you’ll be sending as a prospective applicant,, or making sure your academic record looks as good as it can. With enrollments increasing at many of the top schools, college is only becoming more competitive.

Here are a few of our suggestions for you to consider:

  1. Get an early start and finish strong: Colleges want to see that you've focused from the start of your school career and are getting the best possible education your school has to offer.
  2. Challenge yourself responsibly: While grades remain the single biggest factor in admissions decisions, strength of curriculum is an ever-closer second. In the National Association for College Admission Counseling's most recent "State of College Admission" survey, 66 percent of staffers said they assign considerable weight to degree of challenge.
  3. Get involved in something! Getting ready for college isn't all work. Find something you really like doing, then dive into it. Maybe you're drawn to sports, student council, music, art ... you get the picture. You'll develop skills and be more appealing to colleges (they like students who'll add something to campus life).
  4. Get Help if you are having trouble in a class. Many schools have peer tutors, students in upper grades who'll help you (for free). Talk to teachers or counselors – let them know you want extra help.
  5. Read at least 30 minutes every day, beyond study and homework. Read what interests you – magazines, novels, whatever. People who read more know more. And when you take PSAT/NMSQT™, ACT, and SAT® tests, knowing more will really pay off.

We believe that there a right way to get into college, and this is the prepared way. The college process is not about getting into the best college, we don't believe in a 'best college' since there is no school that is best for all students. Your student, your family, and your goals are different from everyone else and it is our process that will get you the results you want.